How to drive footfall to your business 

How to drive footfall to your business 

You’ve got your loan agreed and the money is in the bank.

You’ve set up your business, but now you need to drive the sales into the business.

Unfortunately, much as we would all love it to happen immediately, often it takes a bit of time for people to get to know that you now exist.

Having said that you don’t want to spend lots of money on marketing, that’s completely understandable.

So, here are some tips to help you to drive footfall into your business without breaking the bank.

Google my business:

Google is key to you getting found.  So make sure you’re listed on Google my Business.

What’s more it’s free to use.  And often Google will send you a voucher to use for Advertising.

To make it work even harder, get your customers to give you a review.  That way when people find you online, they can also see what a great service you give.

Social Media:

Running a social media account can be hard work.   Having said that social media is a great alternative to having a website and has no cost associated with it, only your time.

Local noticeboards are great places to start to get your name out.  And if you prove popular, are also a great way of getting people to spread the word about you.

Use the platform that you are familiar with and like using and post updates to on that.  People like to be nosy so think about:

  • Behind the scenes
  • Customer of the week
  • News

Flyers:

Key to getting customers is people knowing that you are there.

Using services such as Vista Print allows you to design and print a leaflet at a reasonable price.

Once printed, it’s worth walking around the local area delivering the leaflets through the doors of residents.

Also give them out at key traffic points, for example.

You can also use them as posters on Parish Noticeboards, in the local library.

Board outside the shop:

Create intrigue or stand out with an A board.

This is particularly important if you are up an alleyway and people don’t automatically pass your establishment.

But it also works to get people to notice you.

Get a blank blackboard one which you can attach posters to, or which you can change depending on what is going on.  You can also use this to highlight why people should come & visit.

Just one thing you need to be aware of.  You may need the local council’s permission to put this board out depending on where you are located.

Local Newspaper:

The local newspaper is always looking for stories.  Why not approach them with yours?  Why have you set up, what you’re wanting to offer the local community.

Use your business plan that was developed for your loan to help you.

Incentivising people to come in and come back:

When you’re starting out, it’s worth adding a small incentive to get people to try you out.  Think about giving value, rather than discounting.

So, offering a side dish with any main meal or similar.  Whatever you decide to use, don’t forget to do the maths to make sure it’s not costing you more than it needs to.

To get people coming back, it’s worth thinking about a simple loyalty card.

Do work out what you can give away without impacting the bottom line.  But a couple of examples are:

  • Buy 5 meals, get a free side
  • For every £10 spent, get a stamp. Once you have 10 stamps, get a free meal.

Whilst we recommend using incentives, they should only be used sparingly.

Running special offers all the time creates an expectation for customers that they don’t have to pay full price.  Something you want to avoid.

So there we go, just a few tips to help you on your way.

If you want any further help, do get in touch as we have several partners who can guide you in the right direction.

Exit Strategies and why the end should start at the beginning

Exit Strategies and why the end should start at the beginning

When it comes to success in business, there’s a chapter people rarely consider. The art of the exit strategy is the part of the business journey which stands entrepreneurs apart from the crowd.

Some would argue that you’ve only been successful if you’ve exited with a return on your investment, ready to move on to the next bigger and better opportunity.

This is the third and final blog in my three-part series about how to Aim Big, Think Big and Act Big. These are the three essential steps to guaranteed business growth that I spoke about in my first blog of the series.

So, how do we Act Big? I’d like to take you back to my little dog, Baxter, and his very big stick. I guess Baxter has the luxury of not needing to worry about where his big stick journey goes. To me, there’s a clear failure coming, when he realises that half a tree isn’t the best thing to decide to carry on a long walk. But, he’s living in the moment, and very happy to do so.

When it comes to business, we can’t afford to set ourselves up for failure. Which is why, oddly, one of the first questions I ask a business founder is “What happens at the end?” I’m not for a minute suggesting their business won’t continue, very successfully, for many years. But I am suggesting that they might not always be a part of it.

Unlocking the door

There are lots of choices when it comes to an exit strategy, the four most common are:

  • Management Buy Out (MBO) – when an executive team combines resources to acquire some or all of the business they manage;
  • Outside Sale – a straight sale to new owners;
  • Merger & Acquisition (M&A) – either merging with a similarly sized company or being bought by a larger one;
  • Initial Public Offering (IPO) – essentially floating on the stock market and raising capital from external investors, not as popular as it once was, following the bursting of the dot-com bubble;

There’s no ‘best’ option as the right strategy will be the one which fits your business and personal goals. It’s this framing and planning stage which should come at the start of the business journey to enable you to structure your business for ultimate success in the exit strategy you choose.

Determining the right balance between personal and business goals as well as honouring any investments needs careful planning. The key point of the strategy is to optimise the value of the business so planning from an early stage provides maximum flexibility and opportunity.

By acknowledging and actioning the need for an exit strategy, not only are we fulfilling the need to Act Big, we are giving ourselves the opportunity to grow yet more in the future as we have the chance to move on to greater challenges or more business opportunities.

 

Seven Simple Questions to ask before Starting your own Business…

Seven Simple Questions to ask before Starting your own Business…

Yesterday I was chatting to someone at the pool and they asked me what I did for a living.

I said “I have my own business”, to which they replied “That’s great, I would love to be my own boss”.

But is that all it’s about?

Definitely not – jumping into the start-up world is a big decision and you need to be completely convinced that you have a great idea you are passionate about.

Even with this belief, you risk a great deal getting started and there’s no guarantee you’ll succeed.

There’s loads of advice online and in start-up workshops, but basically you need to ask yourself seven simple questions before you take the leap:

1. Why do I want to start my own business?

If you simply hate your job, or you’re following a trend, it probably won’t survive. You need to solve a problem in an industry you love and this passion will help you succeed.

2. What problem(s) am I solving?

You need to provide something unique that will solve a problem for someone else. If they can do it themselves then there is no need to buy from you!

3. What lifestyle sacrifices am I willing to make?

It’s a big decision to give up a high-paying job to follow your entrepreneurial idea. You need to be brutally honest with yourself and ask what kind of lifestyle you would be comfortable with.

4. Will my family and friends be supportive?

The small business rollercoaster takes you up and down, and as you veer from ‘busy excitement’ to ‘tumble weed depression’, you need to have supportive people around you.

5. How much money will I need?

It’s good to have some savings to use in the early days, but don’t stretch yourself too thin. Cash flow can be a killer so make sure that you have loans or access to more cash if necessary.

6. Should I grow quickly or take my time?

If you have a great business idea, you should seize the moment and grow as fast as you can. This is best with funding so that your investors can realise quick and profitable returns. However, if you’re going it alone with your own money, you can take a little more time.

7. Am I in the right place to launch my business?

You need to either know, or get to know, your industry and make contacts by going to lots of networking and start-up events. Hearing about the experiences of other people is the best way to learn. This can help you work out whether you’re in the right place geographically to launch your product.

Remember it’s great to be your own boss, but it’s your passion and belief in your business idea, plus a strong and stable support structure that will give you the best possible chance of succeeding.

Why cashflow planning is the secret to business success

Why cashflow planning is the secret to business success

The UK is known for being highly entrepreneurial, with over 99% of all domestic businesses being classified as SMEs.

However, research carried out in 2019 showed that 64% of the British workforce has entrepreneurial dreams but an incredible 41% of those are put off setting up their own business by money fears.

In 2016, Hiscox and Bloomberg carried out research showing that 8 out of 10 entrepreneurs who start a business fail within the first 18 months. Cash flow is listed as the number one reason for failure.

Cash Is King

No surprise then, that my latest blog is all about cash. That four-letter-word which proves so critical to everything we do in business. At Streamlion, we help businesses to find funding for their entrepreneurial dreams but to do that effectively, we need to really focus in on cash.
Love or loathe the saying, but cash really is king.

Creating a cashflow forecast

When entrepreneurs work with Streamlion to arrange a business loan, we take a detailed look at cashflow forecasts, plotting out how and when they expect to make their sales.

Often, simply by undertaking this task, business owners give real thought to the incomings and outgoings of their business for the first time. It’s easy to think in ‘big handfuls’ when planning a business concept or launch but getting down to the finer detail will quickly expose unsafe assumptions or gaps in your business plan.

Doing a cashflow forecast at an early stage in the life of the business is also a great way to get into the habit of continually updating it. Cashflow isn’t something we glance at now and again. As a successful business owner, you need to have a clear view of your cash situation at pretty much every given moment.

That’s because, even if you have the funding you require to start the business, your cash can also be affected by late payment of invoices. This is an ongoing problem for the majority of Britain’s SMEs. In fact, during 2018, accounting software business FreeAgent found that just 58% of invoices were paid on time or within a 3-day window of their due date.

Gary Turner, Co-Founder and Managing Director of Xero puts this problem into sharp focus:

“Late payments don’t just damage business finances and relationships, they compromise personal finances and relationships. Our research illustrates how getting paid on time can have a dramatic effect on a small business owner’s happiness. When small businesses struggle, the whole of the UK struggles.”

Clarity of cashflow is key to decision making

Having a medium-term view of your cashflow is critical when it comes to business operations. When you run a business, you continually need to make sound decisions, often quickly. Whether your biggest customer goes bankrupt and can’t pay their latest invoice, or emergency investment is needed, you need to know whether the business can cope with the situation financially.

A sudden interruption to cashflow can be catastrophic for SME businesses. According to the Federation of Small Businesses, combatting late payments could keep an additional 500,000 businesses open every year.

The statistics are compelling. Positive cashflow is key to survival unless you have the funding you need to ride out the tricky times. Funding is always at a preferable rate if applied for in advance, so having the information you need, at the click of a button, gives you and your business a distinct advantage.

As recently as 2018, the government committed to improving the late payment situation by affording protection to smaller businesses, who are the main sufferers when larger companies take too long to pay. So, the issue has been recognised, but we’re yet to see any firm legislation. Let’s hope our leaders can see the benefit of supporting entrepreneurship and work harder to ensure the UK retains its reputation as one of the best countries in the world in which to start a business.

Start Up Loans – Changes to Eligibility Rules

Start Up Loans – Changes to Eligibility Rules

This March has seen a positive change to the legislation concerning Start Up Loans.

Previously, to be eligible for a start-up loan, a business could only apply if it had been trading for two years or less. Now loans will be available to businesses that have been trading for up to three years. This is a huge opportunity for lots of early stage businesses.

Borrowing money to start a business, as with most things, comes down to careful and thorough planning, with a hefty dose of previous experience to get you through the process quickly and successfully.

At Streamlion, we’ve got that experience in spades, so we suggest you let us take the strain when it comes to your funding. We will aid you through the entire start up loan application process, assist with your business plan and financial forecast and set you on the road to success right from the outset.

In addition, the term has been extended for a second loan. A second loan makes additional funds available to a previous Start Up Loan borrower against the same business idea. The term is now five years which gives greater opportunity for those businesses scaling up.

For a second loan you must be able to show positive trading for at least a three month period and you will need to have an updated financial forecast that mirrors trading to date. We can help you with this.

If you could benefit from this loan or have business associates or friends who are looking for funding, get in touch now.

How to scale your business – part two

How to scale your business – part two

Our last blog discussed the differences between – and challenges associated with – growing and scaling a business. This time, we want to share some tips to help you successfully scale your business.

Scaling a business is about more than just growing your sales and employing more people. To successfully scale, your business needs to be based on the right foundations which ensure it is equipped to deal with a continued higher volume of transactions. It will undoubtedly involve further investment and a good amount of time invested in strategizing for future success.

At Streamlion, we work with clients at all stages of building and scaling businesses so we thought it would be useful to capture our top 5 tips on how to scale your business successfully.

Top Tip #1: Start at the beginning

It’s all too easy for excitable entrepreneurs to leap over the initial stages of scaling a business and move straight to the increase in marketing or selling. Before that, it’s essential to ensure your business is equipped to handle this extra throughput. Not doing so could result in disappointed customers which, in turn, could seriously damage your reputation and put paid to any future plans for growth. Premature scaling is cited as one of the leading causes of startup failure.

The beginning is the planning. Scaling a business is not the same as growing it. Scaling involves innovating your business model as well as your product or service. You need to invest time in working out potential new markets, back-office automation and funding.

Top Tip #2: The price of growth

Scaling a business effectively is never cheap. In fact, one of the most common reasons that startups fail to scale is down to funding. And funding a scale-up is an entirely different prospect to funding a startup so it’s essential to work with experts who can help with creating a sustained growth plan as well as helping you understand the transformations that need to happen to set the business up for a successful future.

Like scaling, finding funding is down to putting in the right preparation and demonstrating that your business is ready for change and growth.

Top Tip #3: Optimisation is key to transformation

To quote Einstein “If I had one hour to save the world, I would spend 55 minutes defining the problem and only five minutes finding the solution.” Scaling a business needs the same approach; success is all about understanding how things work and how they need improving to cope with larger volume.

Achieving automation and integration, which are the likely outcomes of optimisation, will likely involve technology. The happy fact is, there’s no shortage of packages, apps and products that can help make things easier. However, finding the right one for your business is critical.

CRMs, automated marketing, accounting and your overall IT network all need to come under the microscope at this stage.

Top Tip #4: A change of pace

Your business goals might be clearer but it’s a well-documented fact that change management needs careful handling.

As well as any team members involved, it’s well worth getting under the skin of your customer experience journey. Plotting out every touchpoint between you and your clients will help to identify any areas that might need attention prior to scaling. We use Customer Journey Maps to help our clients to see any areas of friction which might cause problems when scaled. Additionally, you can identify areas for investment, which could be wrapped up with the other areas that need funding in order to create the very best version of your business.

Top Tip #5: It’s not all about you

Creating a business is a little like having a baby, you bring it into being, nurture and help it to grow and, inevitably, you eventually leave it to stand on its own two feet. This time is now.

For a business to scale, it needs to be able to operate consistently based on the policies and processes you’ve spent so long assessing and improving. You have options as to whether you outsource some of the regular activities, or whether you hire a team to run things for you. Either way, taking a step back for the first time can be daunting.

The key thing to remember is that you’ve invested time in getting things right, so your business is ready for this, even if you aren’t. It’s also really important to hire the right people – people you know share your values and will continue to inject enthusiasm and innovation into the business.

Finally, as with most things in business, successful scaling is also a mindset. By working with a strong team of advisers and having faith in your own ideas, scalability becomes infinitely easier.

At Streamlion Consulting, we are experts in knowing and advising on the difference between growing and scaling your business.

Our scale-up workshops are designed to help entrepreneurs face exactly this type of challenge. We spend time looking at your business, acting as your trusted advisor to help you to make the decision that’s right for you and your business goals and aspirations. And we can then help find funding for this type of expansion.

If you’re interested in finding out more, contact Helen on helen@streamlionconsulting.com or call 07790 493033.

How to scale your business – part one

How to scale your business – part one

Your business is established.  Your customers keep coming back time after time, and they are recommending you to their friends.  It’s time to move to the next level.

When we look at the next level for businesses, we talk about growth and we talk about scaling.

But what does that really mean and which should you be doing?

The difference between growing and scaling

Growth is about increasing your revenue in linear terms.  You add resources, such as capital, people or technology and your revenue increases as a result.

Scaling on the other hand is when your revenue increases without a substantial increase in resources. You can expand without being hampered.

For example, take a food truck which cooks and delivers take away meals.

Business is good with lots of customers. The standard of cooking is high and all meals are consistently well made and delivered warm and on time.

If you’re looking to grow an obvious thing to do is to replicate what you’re doing with your first truck. You buy one or more new trucks and hire a different person to run that truck, cook the food, organise deliveries etc.

Your revenue will increase, but so will the resources to maintain that growth.  Resources that will often drain profits, time and energy.

Scaling: taking a different approach

If you scale, however, you take a different approach.

Scaling is about increasing revenue without incurring significant increased costs to the running the business.

It’s about finding ways of doing things more efficiently in order to keep the costs down and be able to grow faster than previously possible.

Think about these problems within the growth business:

  1. How do you maintain consistently high-quality food when you have many more trucks in different places with different people cooking?
  2. How do you manage the different food truck owners to make sure the deliveries are done effectively, avoiding longer waiting times and deliveries of food that’s not warm enough?

You’re stretched having to train 5 different chefs, the delivery drivers are inconsistent, and you’re limited in the amount of food you can supply for both take-away and delivery because it’s all coming out of individual trucks.

We need to start thinking differently.  To look at how the business can work with less resources, to be able to expand your current reach, potentially even reach new audiences, or unlock new markets without adding to the costs.

So with our food truck example, rather than replicating the model, we look at how else the business could run.

  1. Multiple food trucks: But the food is prepped in a central kitchen and then delivered just before service to be finished off.  This allows you to maintain high-quality food.  It can be cooked more quickly at the truck because it’s already been prepped and so you can serve more customers per truck.
  2. Delivery is conducted centrally: Rather than delivery drivers going to each truck, they go from one central location, where the food is cooked fresh.  Control over quality, control over delivery times and no distractions for those who are serving in the trucks.

Rethink the model and you’ll be able to grow faster than previously possible.

How Streamlion can help

At Streamlion Consulting, we are experts in knowing and advising on the difference between growing and scaling your business.

Our scale-up workshops are designed to help entrepreneurs face exactly this type of challenge. We spend time looking at your business, acting as your trusted advisor to help you to make the decision that’s right for you and your business goals and aspirations. And we can then help find funding for this type of expansion.

We are experienced and trusted by many of our clients to step in and help with this process as and when further scaling up means more funding is needed. We can give you the peace of mind that you haven’t missed anything when planning the future of your business by acting as your trusted business advisor.

If you’re interested in finding out more, contact Helen on helen@streamlionconsulting.com or call 07790 493033.

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The importance of the credit check when starting a new business

The importance of the credit check when starting a new business

Starting a new business is daunting at the best of times, but when you need to consider a loan in order to get set up, it goes to another level.

Funding is such a vital part of getting set up for product businesses; buying stock, renting premises etc. but it can feel that lenders are holding back, making you doubt whether or not you want to continue on the journey.

At Streamlion, we’re really proud of our high success rate when it comes to getting start-ups off the ground but there is one area that prospective business owners can do to really maximise their chances of success.

Making sure you understand your credit history and your credit score. 

What does that mean?

Your credit history and credit scores are vital pieces of information that lenders use to understand your financial wellbeing.

They tell the lender a lot about you – how well you have repaid debt in the past, if you have missed any repayments on mobile phones, utility bills, rental/mortgages and also how much you owe other people.

Lenders will never want to add more debt to your burden, so they always make sure you can afford the loan repayments before approval is granted.

Your aim is a fair to good credit score.  So, before you start looking for any funding, it’s worth looking at your credit score to make sure you won’t fall at the first hurdle.

What do you need to do?

You can check your credit score using one of these sites.

All three of the above allow you to carry out a free check on your credit score.

An Experian credit score is out of 999. ClearScore credit checks are out of 700 and Equifax are out of 850.

All these will tell you what it is and how it compares to the national average.  A healthy credit score means you can apply for any funding you want with confidence.  This tends to be a score that is fair to good or above.

The website will also give you guidance on areas that need attention.

What happens if my credit score is Very Poor or Poor?

The good news is that you can do something about it.

When you get your credit score, you will be able to download your credit report as a PDF.  This will give all the detail you need to help you understand what has influenced your score.

The sorts of things that can negatively affect credit scores are:

  • Late or non-payment of bills
  • Being close to credit limits on overdrafts or credit cards
  • Too many ‘hard’ credit checks – these are checks carried out by lenders & creditors in the past
  • County Court Judgements (CCJs)

Whichever company you use to check your credit score will be able to help you to improve the score.  Just get in touch with them directly.

And ongoing?  What to do……

It’s good discipline to check your credit score every month. Many of the websites will offer the chance for an automated update to be sent to you. This means you will know of any issues at an early stage and can take action to remedy them.

Then as soon as you’re ready, you can apply for the funding you want with confidence and achieve your new business dream.

Streamlion specialises in helping entrepreneurs starting on their business journey.  We help you create a business plan and finance details which ensures that your loan application will be successful.  We can give you the peace of mind that you haven’t missed anything with your loan application by acting as your trusted business advisor.

If you’re interested in finding out more, contact Helen via helen@streamlionconsulting.com or call 07790 493033.

 

What’s the best source of funding for my start-up business?

What’s the best source of funding for my start-up business?

If you’ve got an exciting new idea for a business, you’re probably aware of the minefield that is funding applications.

Should you approach your bank or choose a start-up loans specialist lender? Read on, and we’ll demystify all.

The choice

High Street Banks – traditionally, banks have preferred to loan money to established businesses as they like to mitigate their risk with some form of security (such as your assets) to underwrite the loan. This hasn’t really changed and, despite some claims that they lend to start-ups, once you get to the small print, they are only offering growth or expansion loans to those who have already started trading for at least 2 years and filed positive returns.

Start-up Loan Scheme – this is the government-backed Start-Up Loan Scheme. These loans are considered a personal loan but can only be used for business purposes. They are unsecured, which means there is no need for your assets to be secured against the loan. They are available to brand new businesses who have not yet started trading, and established businesses that have been trading for less than 2 years.

Alternative Lenders – there are some lenders out there who will lend to start-up businesses. Typically this will be industry specific and over a certain minimum amount. Can also be postcode dependent and the interest rates are usually higher.

The real choice

Once you start investigating what’s available, you are likely to find the start-up loan scheme is the only viable option for most genuine start-up businesses.

The scheme has been set up to focus on new businesses and there is no risk to your personal assets with this method of financing. Loans are available up to the value of £25,000, payable over 60 months maximum at an interest rate of 6%.

Don’t be put off by the narrative that start-up loans are “for would-be business owners who have struggled to secure funding from traditional lenders”. This doesn’t mean start-up loans are for people with poor credit ratings or high-risk businesses. It simply means that you need to try to secure funding from your bank first and if unsuccessful, then the start-up loan scheme is there for you. And you do need a good credit rating and eligible business idea to apply.

How to apply

Start-up loan timeframes vary hugely and that’s because there are so many different ways you can apply. From a completely do-it-yourself approach, to working with a broker or advisor, the key to a swift and successful application is to plan thoroughly and carefully.

That’s where Streamlion comes in. To date, we’ve helped our clients with over 500 applications and secured them over £7.7 million of funding. To do this, we partner with the UK’s number one start-up loans provider, Transmit Start-Ups, and we can work with you in different ways including:

  • Have an initial discussion with you about your business idea and the viability of your plans. We have a great deal of experience in many different industries, so can help you create a business model that works for you.
  • Explain about the importance of the credit check and guide you to the secure start-up loans application page so you can begin the process and complete these important checks.
  • Help you submit your business idea, financial forecast, loan expenditure and ‘personal survival budget’ (this is the main loan application process, and we can also check all your documentation to ensure you have the highest chance of success)
  • Work with you through the review of your loan application to approval and receipt of your funds.

If you’d like to know more about accessing funding for your start-up business, why not get in touch for a chat? You can contact Helen, Streamlion’s founder, on 07790 493033 or email helen@streamlionconsulting.com

When it comes to start-up advice, can you afford to take it for free?

When it comes to start-up advice, can you afford to take it for free?

When you want to start a new business, success is dependent on getting off to a good start. It’s a stressful time for entrepreneurs and founders: searching for the right advice, from a trusted source, obtaining the necessary funding and making lots of decisions in a short space of time.

It’s a time when you need your network: knowing you can trust people is of the utmost importance as you navigate the challenges to get your idea off the ground.

If you’re lucky, someone in your network or community will be able to point you in the right direction for those critical factors such as financing, finding a premises and writing your business plan. But you might not have access to the right people and statistics show it really matters who you choose to work with at this stage.

Did you know that the use of paid advice can increase your turnover by 23%?

That’s quite a step up and makes investing in trusted, paid advice well worth it.

At Streamlion Consulting, we work with a wide range of prospective business owners and have an impressive track record in getting people the advice and funding they need. So, what are our tips for entrepreneurs who want to succeed in setting up a thriving business?

  • Make sure you work with someone who has experience in helping new business owners get their idea off the ground. There are many ways to make this process easier than it would be if you decided to go it alone so make sure you tap into this knowledge and achieve the quickest, smoothest route to market that you can, even if you do need to pay to achieve this;
  • It’s also important to get advice from someone who knows what is needed when it comes to funding. Rejection is much less likely if you have the right information and paperwork is completed correctly and in a timely manner. When it comes to business, time is money and every day saved is a day when you could be making money;
  • An experienced advisor like Streamlion might mean you need to make an initial investment, but this will pay you back many times over when you are able to get a faster, successful loan decision first time which avoids all the stress of having to wait and reapply;
  • Seeking external advice can feel counter-intuitive when you already have a trusted network but, in fact, it means you are more likely to receive the right advice, first time. Look for an advisor who has a professional set up with website, LinkedIn profile and other social media channels where you can see the quality and consistency of their work. Check out their reviews and ask to speak to a previous client to find out whether they represent good value;
  • Finally, look for someone who will explain the details of the process in clear, simple language. There shouldn’t be any confusion or misunderstandings. You are the client and you should expect a respectful and professional approach to all your interactions with your advisor.

Taking inexperienced advice or trying to get through this convoluted process by yourself are more stressful and less reliable ways to start your business. In an ideal world, you should be up and running as quickly as possible and making the most of your great business idea. By working with a trusted, professional advisor, you’ll guarantee this and will also have a supporter and ally who can help with your business as it grows too.

The Entrepreneur Handbook

The Entrepreneur Handbook

We often think of entrepreneurialism as a solo endeavour, but it doesn’t have to be that way. Many successful partnerships – or bigger groups – launch and run businesses. However, as with anything in business, relationships are key and working with others inevitably adds another dimension to be considered and nurtured as you build and grow. The Entrepreneur Handbook has a useful article covering what they see as the three main things to consider when looking for a business partner.

It’s an essential read if you’re starting a journey of discovery for the perfect partner.

The best business ideas – 2021

The best business ideas – 2021

A regular feature in Streamlion’s blog, the best business ideas are out for 2021. Published by Startups.co.uk they are definitely of a slightly different ilk than before with, as you might expect, a heavy influence from tech, virtual and….. dogs.

These, though, are the trends of lockdown Britain. We’re now used to operating in an online world (although the first idea on the list takes this to a new extreme….) and, apparently, a massive number of us took on a dog for the first time and now need support.

At Streamlion, we can really identify with number 8 on this list: localisation. We’ve seen a huge increase in small, local businesses – lots of them in the catering space – making the most of people’s movements being restricted.